The United States is built on the idea that different states have different needs, and one-size-fits-all regulations are rarely the best option. With 3.5 million square miles of landmass, varying altitudes, and a wide range of population densities and industries, implementing any massive regulatory change pertaining to air pollution would be implausible and ineffective.

Simply put, applying the same standard to a manufacturer in Iowa and California wouldn’t take into consideration the needs of either business or the community surrounding it. An overarching standard would be too strict for one and too lax for the other and would fail to take into consideration the processes and practices that may work for either.

Different Localities, Different Regulations

Therefore, under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the EPA introduced State Implementation Plans (SIP), Tribal Implementation Plans (TIP), and Federal Implementation Plans (FIP) that allow different states to set different standards pursuant to the needs of each state.

Under the current regulatory environment, the Clean Air Act sets primary and secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), separating each state into 10 Air Quality Control Regions (AQCR):

  • Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Tribal Nations
  • Region 2: New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands and Tribal Nations
  • Region 3: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia
  • Region 4: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Tribal Nations
  • Region 5: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin and Tribal Nations
  • Region 6: Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Texas and Tribal Nations
  • Region 7: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Tribal Nations
  • Region 8: Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming and Tribal Nations
  • Region 9: Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, the Pacific Islands, and Tribal Nations
  • Region 10: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Tribal Nations

Approved Air Quality Implementation Plans can be viewed by region here.

For each AQCR, the state must determine whether or not the region has attained the NAAQS for each criteria pollutant and have the ability to design their own standards based on the regional requirements, submitting implementation plans to the EPA, who will in turn approve or deny such a plan. Each proposed state plan must include procedural requirements, control strategies, a process for reviewing new sources and modifications, surveillance practices, reporting and recordkeeping information, compliance schedules and demonstration of authority.

Resources for Manufacturers: Where to Find State Implementation Plans and Permitting Information

While the regional approach provides manufacturers with tailored requirements based on the location of each facility, it also makes for a lot of paperwork if a company intends to open a new facility, make modifications to their production line, or update air pollution control equipment. For instance, a manufacturer may need to file one or more of the following forms with the state:

  • Permit Application and Exemption Submittals to Regulatory Agencies
  • Permit Condition Negotiations
  • Air Dispersion Modeling Studies
  • Compliance Audits, Assessments and Program Assistance
  • Notice-of-Violation Technical Support
  • New Source Performance Standards (NSPS)
  • National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS)
  • Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)
  • Title III – Air Toxics/Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs)
  • Maximum Available Control Technology (MACT) and Best Available Control Technology (BACT) studies
  • Title IV – Acid Rain (Regulation 75)
  • Title V – Operating Permit Program

State-by-State Information and Resources

To help you find information quickly and easily for your state, we have compiled the following information about the permitting agency, state implementation plan, and other governing agencies for each state with links to each:

Alabama

Alaska

American Samoa

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Guam

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Northern Mariana Islands, Commonwealth of (CNMI)

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Puerto Rico

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

V​ermont

Virgin Islands, U.S.

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

No Matter the State, No Matter the Industry, Compliance is Key

While the local regulations may present a challenge in paperwork, all of them are designed with one goal in mind—to protect the environment. We hope this list provided you with the information you need about your state or region. At The CMM Group, we specialize in the designing, engineering, and installation of pollution control systems for manufacturers in the U.S. and around the world. With many of the states listed above offering grants for implementing a new pollution control solution, we can help you. Learn more about taking control of your emissions by reading our VOC Abatement Guide and when you’re ready to learn more, contact us for more details.

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