Clean Air Act

  • State Pollution Control
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    How to Learn More about Your State’s Pollution Control Requirements

How to Learn More about Your State’s Pollution Control Requirements

The United States is built on the idea that different states have different needs, and one-size-fits-all regulations are rarely the best option. With 3.5 million square miles of landmass, varying altitudes, and a wide range of population densities and industries, implementing any massive regulatory change pertaining to air pollution would be implausible and ineffective.

Simply put, applying the same standard to a manufacturer in Iowa and California wouldn’t take into consideration the needs of either business or the community surrounding it. An overarching standard would be too strict for one and too lax for the other and would fail to […]

  • Air Pollution Abatement
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    The Current and Future Challenges Surrounding Air Pollution Abatement

The Current and Future Challenges Surrounding Air Pollution Abatement

It’s no secret that air pollution is extremely dangerous for both the general public and the environment. This is one of the reasons why the Clean Air Act of 1970 was established in the first place – to help improve public health while reducing the impact humans have on the natural world.

Although the air pollution levels have dramatically decreased over the last 45 years, airborne contamination is still a major issue. Industrial facilities need to abide by regulation set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when it comes to pollution emissions and their abatement mechanisms.

In this article, we’ll discuss […]

The End of Once-In-Always-In

On January 25, 2018, the EPA issued new guidance on a 1995 memo clarifying the initial stance on major and area sources. Now referred to as the “once in always in” rule, this memo set forth rules for the classification of major sources of hazardous air pollutants under section 112 of the Clean Air Act. The update now allows companies the ability to break away from the legal issues that arise for major sources—if they can prove they have reduced emissions to area source levels.
Background: “Once in, Always in”
Section 112 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 made […]

The Science of Pollution Control: Destruction Efficiency

As we continue our Science of Pollution Control series, we would today like to look at another important consideration in pollution control: destruction efficiency.
What is Destruction Efficiency?
Destruction efficiency is, in simple terms, the effectiveness to which an oxidizer (VOC Abatement System) works.

Sometimes referred to as destruction and removal efficiency (DRE), this is a percentage that represents the number of molecules of a compound removed or destroyed in an oxidizer relative to the number of molecules that entered the system. (For example, a DRE of 99.99 percent means that 9,999 molecules are destroyed for every 10,000 that enter.
Calculating Destruction Efficiency
As […]

  • VOC Abatement for Food Manufacturers
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    Choosing the Best VOC Abatement System for Food Manufacturers

Choosing the Best VOC Abatement System for Food Manufacturers

Since the 1970s, food manufacturing facilities are responsible for controlling their dangerous gas emissions. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are some of the most common pollutants food factories and bakeries generate, and can severely hinder the environment if released into the atmosphere untreated.

There are now various VOC abatement systems and technologies available that are suitable for different factories, including food manufacturing and packing facilities. In this article, we will provide you with a few tips on how to find the ideal VOC abatement system for your factory.
Do All Food Manufacturers Need VOC Abatement?
As a rule of thumb, only factories that […]

The CMM Group Releases VOC Abatement Guide

What does new car smell have in common with freshly baked bread? The same thing it has in common with diesel emissions, dry cleaning solution, a can of paint, and a vast majority of manufacturing emissions. All of these are the result of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon-based compounds that exist as a gas in normal temperature and pressure. Many of these compounds are responsible for adverse health, economic, and environmental effects.
Volatile Organic Compounds Pose Threats to Health, Economy, and Environment
While the definition of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) is simple—carbon-based compounds that exist in a gaseous form at normal […]

Know Thy Enemy: Particulate Matter

What can be said about particulate matter? It’s everywhere. Whether it’s larger, visible particles like dust, soot, or road dirt, or smaller particles that are visible en masse like smoke or smog; these particles can cause a lot of issues ranging from temporary discomfort to chronic health issues, as well as reduce visibility and combine with other chemicals to cause compounded damage.

Following our investigations into Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), our deep-dive into their prevalence and removal strategies for VOCs in paint manufacturing, and our look at Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs), we would like to look at another ‘enemy’ of […]

  • RTO Benefits for Manufacturing Facilities
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    How Can Regenerative Thermal Oxidizers Benefit Your Manufacturing Facilities?

How Can Regenerative Thermal Oxidizers Benefit Your Manufacturing Facilities?

When running a factory, there are dozens of regulations that you have to adhere to in order to guarantee that your plant has an all-around positive impact.[1]

Many of these regulations revolve around managing all types of waste generated by a factory, including air pollutants. Regenerative thermal oxidizers have become one of the most effective methods to treat air pollutants and other hazardous emissions in a wide variety of manufacturing facilities, allowing them to stick to the established regulations while keeping operating costs low.
Volatile Organic Compounds and Hazardous Air Pollutants
Volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, are dangerous air pollutants that can […]

Amendments to the Clean Air Act

How well do you know your air pollution regulations and laws? We’ve spent a lot of time looking at different considerations regarding air pollution, starting with a lawsuit in first century AD, a royal edict on pollution in the 1300s, and early efforts to cull air pollution throughout the years, culminating in laws passed in the 1950s, 1960s and 70s that lead us to today’s blog on the Amendments to the Clean Air Act which shaped the current regulatory environment.
CAA Amendments of 1977
The Carter Administration, along with one of the initial proponents of the 1970 Act, looked to make […]

History of Air Pollution Laws – Part 2

The Clean Air Act (CAA) wasn’t the first major change in the regulatory environment. Today, we would like to look at a bit of background, sharing the demands for increased pollution controls in the 40s and 50s, and the move to write the Clean Air Act in 1963, before major changes in 1970.

The Clean Air Act traces its roots back to the Air Pollution Control Act of 1955, signed into law by the Eisenhower Administration, and the Clean Air Act of 1963 and Air Quality Act of 1967, both signed into law by the Johnson Administration. However, the act […]